Are there any German loanwords in Chinese?

When it comes to Chinese, you do not find many loanwords. The structure of the language allows it to stay unique and many international words sound completely different. Take a word ‘bank’ as an example.

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‘More clever’ than others in Germany

The other day I was shopping with a Japanese friend of mine. She wanted to buy some presents for her friends back in Japan. We were wondering around a store for a long time. While I was checking some face creams, she left me to have a look at body lotions. Some minutes later, she came to me and complained that an old lady (another customer) told her not to check lotion flavors by opening the bottle caps. My friend said she ignored the lady and pretended she did not hear her.

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In Germany only

I am taking a break from an actual posting today due to my sickness (it was a pretty tough week at the language school). I would like to share a funny link with you instead. A friend of mine sent it to me on Facebook the other day.

The article is called ’22 Things No One Does Better Than The Germans’. Let’s see if you agree with the list. My friend agreed with that completely. Personally, I find that Japanese cars, American supermarkets, Italian/French/ Russian Classical-era composers, and French/Portuguese baked goods are still better than Germans. ­čÖé

Read it here:

http://www.kiwireport.com/global/22-things-no-one-does-better-than-the-germans/

 

7 things to do in Wilhelma (Stuttgart Zoo and Botanical Garden)

Wilhelma is not only a zoo, but also a botanical garden. The best time to visit it is probably summer or late spring. During these seasons, you can see more animals staying outside and gaze at flower beds, trees, bushes, etc.

The zoo is located on a hilly area. It is advisable to wear comfortable shoes if you want to see all the exhibits.

It can be very crowded in Wilhelma. Be mentally prepared to spend some hours around parents with children, babies, and strollers.

Here are the 7 things you shall not miss:

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Hard to find in Germany (especially for women)

My list of things that I am having troubles to find in Germany (or, at least, in the German city I live in) is probably more interesting for women than men. Mostly, I mention personal hygiene products about which some men do not even care. But if you are a man and want to find out what your expat gf/wife might miss in Germany here we go:

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Du and Sie

Du oder Sie? For many of you, who come to Germany, this concept of duzen (using informal du) and siezen (using formal Sie) can be new. The other day, we had a discussion about die Anrede at school. Many of the students in our group come from China, Iran, Armenia, Spain, and so on. They can draw a parallel between the usage of these pronouns in German and their mother tongue. Basically, you shall use Sie when:

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